Red on Red, 2017
Mark Handforth
Red on Red, 2017
Painted aluminium
H 136 x 65 x 47 in
Unique artwork


Artwork presented in
2018

Living in Miami for the past 20 years, Mark Handforth is deeply attached to the heritage of various American avant-garde movements from the 20th century. He makes free use of a formal vocabulary borrowed from the Ready-Made to Minimal and/or Pop Art, confronting it with an iconography frequently derived from the urban environment. Red on Red, a monumental vivid red star with dented arms, 3.45 m high, associates an icon of American culture—the star—to the cult of the automobile, with the work produced in the manner of a car body.



We The People (detail), Elément #C6.2, 2011
Danh Vo
We The People (detail), Elément #C6.2, 2011
Copper
H 79 x 115 x 38 in
Unique artwork


Artwork presented in
2018

Of Vietnamese origin, conceptual artist Danh Vo grew up in Denmark and today lives between Mexico and Berlin. He is the author of a protean artwork in which he explores the relationships between individual and collective history, and tackles numerous questions relating to identity, memory and belonging. We The People is a reproduction of the Statue of Liberty on a 1:1 scale, made from 400 pieces of copper, intentionally non-assembled. In fact, the reproduction of a life-size Statue of Liberty is prohibited by the United States. The title, We The People, reinforces this idea of fragmentation because these are the first three words from the American Declaration of Independence. This work may be interpreted as an act of rebellion against order, as well as a homage to the act of welcoming (immigrants).



Transformation Instable, 1963-1971
Francisco Sobrino
Transformation Instable, 1963-1971
Mirror polished steel
H 236 x 71 x71 inches
Unique artwork


Artwork presented in
2016-2018

Since the early 1960s, Sobrino has used both smoked transparent and coloured Plexiglas to create his works. The superposition and juxtaposition of simple geometric forms gives birth to complex compositions, creating a playful dialogue between the space and the light, which can be appreciated as the viewer moves around the artwork. In 1963, the artist decided to create geometric modules using a material that would allow these to be exhibited out of doors. This new series in mirror polished steel is entitled Permutational Structures. The reflective surfaces of the work allow it to be fully integrated into its surrounding environment.



Giant Triple Mushroom, circa 2011
Carsten Höller
Giant Triple Mushroom, circa 2011
Polyester, polyurethane, acrylic
H 142 in
Unique artwork


Artwork presented in
2018

With a PhD in Entomology (the science of insects), contemporary German artist  Carsten Höller creates artworks that combine biology, behavioural studies and humanism. In the series Double Mushroom and Giant Triple Mushroom, the artist composes three-dimensional combinations of giant replicas of several types of hallucinogenic and/or toxic mushrooms. The choice of this hybrid form refers to the sensations experienced (the altering of reality and fragmentation of thought) in the case of ingestion.



Lentilles flottantes, 1994
Marta Pan
Lentilles flottantes, 1994
Cast resin, polyester preparation and polyurathane lacquer
Diam. 210 et 105 cm
Edition of 3 ex


Artwork presented in
2018

Initially inspired by vegetal and organic forms (fruit, shells, roots), which she transposed to plaster and clay, her work quickly evolved towards increasingly simple lines, veering towards abstraction. The artist was also interested in the sense of movement she could give to her sculptures. At first, the movement was generated by human movement or intervention. Later, Marta Pan would make use of natural kinetic energy (air and water) to power her sculptures. These natural forces created a dialogue with the artist’s exterior sculpture pieces, particularly with her iconic floating sculptures she started to imagine at the beginning of the1960s.  



Le Secret, 2011
Wim Delvoye
Le Secret, 2011
Patinated bronze
H 79 x Ø 30 in
Unique artwork


Artwork presented in
2018

Wim Delvoye is a Belgian visual artist who, through his creations, often critiques the absurdity of contemporary society in a provocative fashion. Known especially for his installation Cloaca and his tattooed pigs, Delvoye questions the value of art, playing with its image and that of the artist. Le Secret is part of a series entitled ‘Twisted’, in which he transforms the spectator’s gaze on certain classical works, mainly 19th-century baroque sculptures. Here, starting from a piece of work by Auguste Moreau, he uses the technique of 3D scanning to appropriate the original artwork, to twist it (clockwise or anti-clockwise), and to render it from a new angle.



Black Clown Carousel, 2009
Carsten Höller
Black Clown Carousel, 2009
Steel, synthetic leather, fiberglass, light bulbs, electric motor
H 126 x diam. 196.8 inches
Unique artwork


Artwork presented in
2015-2018

Carsten Höller is famous for exploring the narrow line between art and entertainment. With the Carousels, central to the artist’s work, he combines a familiar form linked to childhood with a physical experience and a new mode of perception. The artist has deliberately altered the speed, direction, and materials used in the merry-go-round, so that the visitor, who is invited to participate in this experience, is left confused, disoriented, and full of doubt. In this way, the consensual representation of the carousel, and, by extension, of our childhood memories, is jeopardized by a device that individualises our sensory perception.



1-2-3 Tower, 1993
Sol LeWitt
1-2-3 Tower, 1993
Concrete blocks
H 96 x 48 x 48 inches
Unique artwork


Artwork presented in
2015-2018

The work 1-2-3 Tower is characteristic of Sol LeWitt’s brick structures he started making in the mideighties. By applying the logic of modular systems, he develops a simple geometric progression to form a tower which reminds us of the importance of architecture for his practice. While shape and basic unity are particularly simple in LeWitt’s works, it is the arrangement or the positioning of this shape, adapted to a set of rules defined by the artist that constitutes the finality of the work.



Artwork created in situ
Lattice III, 2008
Conrad Shawcross
Lattice III, 2008
Aluminium
197 x 197 x 276 in
Unique artwork


Artwork presented in
2017-2018

British artist Conrad Shawcross creates a work that may be said to be at the crossroads of the physical sciences, geometry and philosophy. A member of the Royal Academy of Arts, he quickly gained a reputation for himself through his modular, systematic sculptures. One can interpret his work as the exegesis of a variety of texts written by illustrious figures in the history of science (Dorothy Hodgkins, Charles Babbage, etc.). Lattice III explores the geometry of the tetrahedron. The 112 tetrahedra used are arranged in a mesh pattern, akin to atoms. Through its singular structure, the sculpture illustrates the idea of a space in constant expansion, and questions the very nature of the place in which it is shown.



RH 324_10 (Teddy Sculpture w Base), 2014
Peter Regli
RH 324_10 (Teddy Sculpture w Base), 2014
White and black marble
34.6 x 26 x 25 inches
Unique artwork


Artwork presented in
2016-2018

Artist Peter Regli is known for his Land Art installations and interventions. He has created works all around the world, oftentimes anonymously. His project Reality Hacking, begun in the 1990s and still ongoing, consists of almost 300 different actions which are translated for the most part, as a monumental sculpture. Regli’s aim is to disturb or ‘hack into’ our daily life by making free use of overly popular figures which he often places in the most unexpected of locations. This marble Teddy Bear subverts or undermines our traditional image or preconceptions of a teddy bear as being soft and cuddly. Here, Regli creates an imposing, immobile sculpture, made from a cold, heavy material.



Image retouchée, 2015
Wang Du
Image retouchée, 2015
Resin
81 x 94 x 179 inches
Unique artwork


Artwork presented in
2016-2018

Wang Du is an artist whose work offers a critical regard on today’s mediatized society. When the artist arrived in France in 1990, he couldn’t read French and therefore, could only understand the news through the images shown. He thus realized the extent to  which these are often reduced, manipulated and erroneous, and decided to make the the material for his work. He regularly makes use of images from the press which he translates into 3D form, all the while conserving the angle and perspective of the original shot. As seen in this Image retouchée [Retouched image], Wang Du likes to sensationalize or monumentalize news items, which take on another dimension thanks to his artistic rendering of the subject.



Subtraction Screen (DdM), 2017
José León Cerrillo
Subtraction Screen (DdM), 2017
Stainless steel and powder coated paint
157.5 x 157.5 x 3.9 in
Unique artwork


Artwork presented in
2017-2018

José León Cerrillo is a protean artist who explores modes of representation through a broad range of media such as posters, sculpture, installation and performance. His work is rooted in simple geometric systems and is interested in the complication and codification of language and perception. His artworks disturb and disrupt our perception. Also drawing inspiration from architectural blueprints and technical drawings from the spheres of design and graphic design, Cerrillo projects abstract autonomous forms into real space, thereby freeing them from the spatial limits of the place that surrounds them. Subtraction Screen (DdM) is an example of his work in this vein and was realized specifically for the Domaine du Muy.



Domestic Landscape and Affinities, 2014
Isa Melsheimer
Domestic Landscape and Affinities, 2014
Reinforced concrete, plants, neon tube for plants
H 39.4 inches x 78.7 x 39.4 inches
Unique artwork


Artwork presented in
2015-2018

This piece was created by formwork, a technique more common to the construction of buildings which involves filling a mould with cement. Its multi-level form includes flat surfaces on which plants or objects could be placed, or members of the public may sit down. The composition of the work recalls the Brutalist architecture of the 1960s and 1970s, which Melsheimer has recreated in her gouache sketches. This piece forms part of the artist’s research into architectural forms, and more specifically those of modernism and its descendants.



We Are Concrete - We Are Bodies - We Have Sex - We Are Neoretroactive - We Are Relative (I), 2014
Isa Melsheimer
We Are Concrete - We Are Bodies - We Have Sex - We Are Neoretroactive - We Are Relative (I), 2014
Fibreglass, reinforced concrete, aquatic plants
3 parts H 16.5 x 18.5 x 13.8 inches, H 16.5 x 18.5 x 10.3 inches, H 16.5 x 18.5 x 11 inches
Unique artwork


Artwork presented in
2015-2018

The three elements of this work serve various functions, ranging from a stool to a Brutalist flowerpot. They are miniature copies of skyscrapers and so recreate an urban landscape. The title of the work is the artist’s subtle adaptation of Benjamin de Casseres’ poem Mirrors of New York (1925), an allusion to the architectural modernism used as a motif in her work. The same lines were used by Rem Koolhaas as an epigram to his classic text Delirious New York: A Retroactive Manifesto for Manhattan (1978).



Stonewall, 2006
Monica Bonvicini
Stonewall, 2006
Galvanized steel, chains, broken safety glass
H 78.7 x 48.4 x 39.4 inches
Unique artwork


Artwork presented in
2015-2018

The Stonewall series was started in 2001, following the riots surrounding the G8 summit in Genoa that year. By combining a metallic barrier and broken glass, this piece draws together a symbol of power – the barriers that hold back the crowds – and the broken windows that result from a violent reaction to it. Beyond this symbolism,  Monica Bonvicini accentuates the psychological tension inherent in the materials used in modern architecture.



Sans titre (Banc), 2006
Jean-François Fourtou
Sans titre (Banc), 2006
Painted wood, steel
H 63.4 x 122 x 28 inches
Unique artwork


Artwork presented in
2015-2018

This bench is part of the immense work entitled Mes Maisons [My Houses], created in 2007. Based on his own memories, Jean-François Fourtou has reconstructed part of his great-grandmother’s house to double scale. The objects in it (broom, chairs, bench, bed) take on once again the disproportionate size they appeared to have when the artist was a child. This playing with scale, which Jean- Fran.ois Fourtou is fond of, disrupts our adult points of reference and naturally sends the spectator back to their childlike state and perspective.



Signal éolien, 2006
Takis
Signal éolien, 2006
Iron, steel
H 162.6 x 197 inches approx.
Unique artwork


Artwork presented in
2015-2018

Takis’ work is characterised by an interaction between artistic form and scientific phenomenon. Previous pieces experimented with the energy of magnetic fields, and here Takis has turned to exploring the kinetic energy of the wind. The Signal Éolien is a mechanical apparatus working on a similar principle to the wind turbine. Its blades move randomly, in accordance with the strength and direction of the wind, rendering a natural phenomenon visible and establishing a dialogue between this monumental work and its surroundings. The natural elements activate and contribute to the poetry of Takis’ work, which is thus freed from the traditional stasis of sculpture.



Red M&M (No. 7)
Dan Colen
Red M&M (No. 7)
Rock and acrylic paint
36 x 70 x 48 inches
Unique artwork


Artwork presented in
2016-2018

Dan Colen is an artist who appropriates the codes of Street Culture and Pop Art to contaminate and distort our perception of the ordinary and the everyday. He makes use of poor materials (natural or disposable) in his multidisciplinary work, in order to transform them into contemplative, well-crafted artworks. The M&Ms series, begun in 2012, is made using real stones, painted in the bright colours of the famous sweets. The series can be said to monumentalize a simple, almost universal pleasure.



Poisson Paysage, 2007
François-Xavier Lalanne
Poisson Paysage, 2007
Bronze
H 80.7 x 120.1 x 33.3 inches
Edition of 8 ex


Artwork presented in
2015-2018

Principally focusing on the themes of nature and the animal kingdom, François-Xavier Lalanne created a sensitive and humour-infused artistic oeuvre, which results from his heightened awareness of everything around him. Wishing to give his work a more functional quality, the sculpture Poisson Paysage offers the observer a new window on the environment: the fragment of isolated countryside becomes a living photograph.



Untitled (100 %), 2011
Gabriel Kuri
Untitled (100 %), 2011
Painted metal
H 53 x 155 x 53 inches
Unique artwork


Artwork presented in
2016-2018

This sculpture is composed of four parts, each of which represents a quarter of a circle. Together, they form the ‘100%’ referred to in the title, even though when they are assembled they do not form a coherent circle. The position of the elements is important because the artist imagines them in both a realistic and symbolic dimension. Some are placed one against the other, piled on top of each other, stacked or grouped together. They may be said to evoke the relationship that exists between words, information, people and/or social groups. Gabriel Kuri’s metal sculptures create a link between the formal language of modernist sculpture, and the conventions of representing economic and statistical data in curves, pie charts and other diagrams



Population Sommaire, 2010
Guillaume Leblon
Population Sommaire, 2010
Black Terracotta
Variable
Unique artwork


Artwork presented in
2017-2018

Guillaume Leblon’s work offers an alternative way of considering the relationship between spectators, objects, the architecture and their environment. His sculptural work questions space and time. A steel plate delineates a fictitious space, upon which a variety of independent geometric forms are placed. Because of its exposure to nature, the work bears the imprint of time: its appearance changes according to variations in weather and the light. The artist’s reflection on time is also evoked through the use of materials that are altered by their exterior conditions. His sculpture affects its environment just as the environment affects his sculpture.



Chromosaturation pour une allée publique, 1965-2012
Carlos Cruz-Diez
Chromosaturation pour une allée publique, 1965-2012
Plexiglas, aluminium
H 96 x 288 x 192 inches
Unique artwork


Artwork presented in
2015-2018

A pioneer in colour theory, Carlos Cruz-Diez is a major figure of optical and kinetic art. His work uses the purity of colour to modify how we perceive our surroundings and our awareness of reality. In Chromosaturation pour une allée publique, the visitor is immersed in a pavilion composed of three spaces of complementary colours: red, blue, and green. The resulting effects of chromatic saturation stimulate and perturb our senses as we visit the different parts of the artwork.



Green M&M (No. 9), 2014
Dan Colen
Green M&M (No. 9), 2014
Rock and acrylic paint
58 x 78 x 56 in
Unique artwork


Artwork presented in
2016

Dan Colen is an artist who appropriates the codes of Street Culture and Pop Art to contaminate and distort our perception of the ordinary and the everyday. He makes use of poor materials (natural or disposable) in his multidisciplinary work, in order to transform them into contemplative, well-crafted artworks. The M&Ms series, begun in 2012, is made using real stones, painted in the bright colours of the famous sweets. The series can be said to monumentalize a simple, almost universal pleasure.



La Fabrique de la Mémoire, 2008
Anne et Patrick Poirier
La Fabrique de la Mémoire, 2008
Nine-sided mirror-construction with sand blasted writing
Each Panel: 98 x 51 in
Unique artwork


Artwork presented in
2017-2018

Sculptors, architects and archaeologists, Anne and Patrick Poirier began their artistic career exploring the sites and ruins of ancient civilizations. Their work is an exploration of history through real or imagined cities, and underlines the permanent fragility of memory, all the while translating the desire of the artists to preserve it. Upon entering this sculpture composed of mirrors, the visitor sees his image and a number of inscriptions sandblasted into the glass, superimposed and multiplied infinitely. From the exterior, the installation reflects its surrounding environment, but on the inside, it allows the union of the work, the environment and the visitor.



Nope, 2012
Liam Gillick
Nope, 2012
Black silkscreen print on white acrylic glass in a double-sided LED lightbox
39.4 x 39.4 x 7 inches
Unique artwork


Artwork presented in
2016-2018

Nope refers to one of Karl Marx’s unpublished texts, in which four characters debate in a satirical manner, a range of absurd subjects taken from unresolved philosophical controversies. At the end of the text, Merten, attempts, in vain, to save his dog from a terrible death by constipation, a pain which the sad dog owner associates with his inability to write and transmit his own reflections. Nope is a direct reference to the constraints of creation, to the self-criticism and personal struggles experienced by all artists. Gillick regularly uses historical and literary references to convey his message.



Direction Through Indirections (Bronze Version), 2003
Sam Durant
Direction Through Indirections (Bronze Version), 2003
Bronze, stainless steel
67 x 74 x 59 inches
Unique artwork


Artwork presented in
2015-2018

Sam Durant is an artist whose works systematically evoke contentious social, political and cultural problems in American history. Direction Through Indirections represents an upside-down tree, placed atop a mirror. This work is a direct reference to Robert Smithson’s Upside Down Trees, to which Sam Durant adds a more symbolic dimension. This tree may be said to represent the genealogical tree and the tree of knowledge, but it is also the symbol of American Indian culture, which in itself is at the origin or root of American culture. Originally created in fibreglass for Upside Down Pastoral Scene, this is a bronze version, especially created to be exhibited out of doors.



Success Failure, 2014
Gianni Motti
Success Failure, 2014
Aluminium printed plates and tube
H 86.6 x 52 x 2.3 inches
Edition of 7 ex


Artwork presented in
2015-2018

Gianni Motti’s work falls outside the traditional formats of the diffusion of art. A master of appropriation and the manipulation of events, his works take the form of absurd and ironic disturbances, and are transformed into an organ of social and political protest. Motti creates disorder with a rare intelligence and a heightened sense of relevance, the absurd and (political) commitment. His motto: be in the wrong place at the right moment. In Success Failure, the artist ironically invites the visitor to make a choice between the path of success and the path of failure, a veritable 21st century obsession.



Pomme de New York, 2006
Claude Lalanne
Pomme de New York, 2006
Bronze
H 97.6 x 85.4 x 88.6 inches
Edition of 8 ex


Artwork presented in
2015-2018

The hybrid, poetic, surrealist works of Claude Lalanne incite both amazement and fascination. Despite its apparent formal simplicity, the Pomme de New York, a sculpture of spectacular dimensions, magnifies the beauty of the most familiar natural forms, in this case that of the apple. Claude Lalanne uses technical processes including moulding, casting, and electroplating to faithfully transpose the fullness and subtlety of animal and plant forms.



Nougat, 2009
Katja Schenker
Nougat, 2009
Concrete, diverse minerals
H 78.7 x78.7 x 19.7 inches
Unique artwork


Artwork presented in
2015-2018

Since the 1990s, Katja Schenker has been developing a work that combines  performance and sculpture, using drawing, photography and video to deepen and document the successive stages of her creative process. This work is the result of a performance piece which took place at the Sittertal Foundation in Saint- Gall, Switzerland in 2009. After digging a hole in the ground, the artist filled the hollow formed with various natural elements, which she then covered completely with concrete. At the end of the exhibition, the block of solidified concrete was extracted from the ground and its sides cut away to reveal the visible process of the work’s creation, like a geological core sample.



Deep Violet, 2014
Mark Handforth
Deep Violet, 2014
Painted Aluminium
H 88.2 x 130 x 55.2 inches
Unique artwork


Artwork presented in
2015

Living in Miami for the past 20 years, Mark Handforth is deeply attached to the heritage of various American avant-garde movements from the 20th century. He makes free use of a formal vocabulary borrowed from the Ready-Made to Minimal and/or Pop Art, confronting it with an iconography frequently derived from the urban environment.



A-Z Deserted Island VI, 1997
Andrea Zittel
A-Z Deserted Island VI, 1997
Fiberglass, wood, plastic, flotation tank, vinyl seat, vinyl logo
H 36 x 90 x 90 inches
Edition of 10 ex


Artwork presented in
2015-2018

American artist Andrea Zittel is best known for her specific approach to space, daily life and its organization. She created all sorts of artworks: sculptures, objects, clothing, caravans, desert islands… Created in 1997 for the Munster Sculpture Project in Germany, A-Z Deserted Island VI forms part of a set of four floating fibreglass “islets”, each furnished with a single chair. Originally intended to float together as a group, the A-Z Deserted Islands convey a need for isolation and privacy, yet also a desire to remain close to a community.



Dynamo, 2010
Atelier Van Lieshout
Dynamo, 2010
Fiberglass, wood, mattress, sheets
H 59 x 65 x 110 inches
Unique artwork


Artwork presented in
2015-2018

This work is a functional, habitable sculpture. Like a mobile hotel room, it offers a degree of basic comfort: the interior is equipped with a mattress, sheets, bedcovers, night-lights and plug sockets. Built out of fibreglass, this housing unit recalls the minimalism of the famous Soft Edge Furniture of the 1990s. The shelter, which is the width of a double bed and resembles a safe, is both reassuring and unsettling, a reminder of the distinctive Japanese capsule hotels which optimise space by offering their guests a simple bed-cabin.



Sans titre, 1985
Keith Haring
Sans titre, 1985
Polyurethane paint on A36 steel
H 80 x 84 x 135 inches
Unique artwork


Artwork presented in
2015-2018

Keith Haring’s sculptural works, produced between 1982 and 1989, were originally intended for use in the public space. The vocation of these pieces is to democratise art, diffusing a direct, accessible message as widely as possible without showing any  concern for the preoccupations of the art world. Monumental sculpture offered Haring the opportunity to develop an alternative to Street Art, a means of sustainably sharing his vigorous, dynamic style in urban settings.



Untitled (4 chairs), 1986-2014
John M. Armleder
Untitled (4 chairs), 1986-2014
4 wooden vintage chairs
H 39.4 x 15.8 x 15.8 inches each
Unique artwork


Artwork presented in
2015-2018

Following in the wake of Duchamp’s readymades, the artist has suspended four ordinary chairs from the tops of trees in the grounds. This absurd gesture is faithful to the philosophy of the Ecart group, founded by Armleder in Switzerland in 1968 along similar lines to Fluxus. Through simple and deliberately humorous associations, Armleder challenges the notion and the status of works of art, a chair perched at the top of a tree thus becoming a monumental sculpture. The sacred aspect of art is here set aside in favour of the pleasure of playfulness and the unexpected.



Artwork created in situ
RockStone 198, 2015
Arik Levy
RockStone 198, 2015
Mirror-polished marine grade stainless steel sculpture, stainless steel plinth
With plinth: H 97.6 x 39.4 x 39.4 inches
Unique artwork


Artwork presented in
2015-2018

The sculpture is inspired by the form of an immense, solid boulder, which it transforms into a modern, digital, smooth, and precise object, as though laser cut. Using the most innovative production techniques, Arik Levy blurs the line between sculpture and contemporary design. The polished, mirrored, stainless steel surfaces of RockStone 198 do not simply reflect nature, they create optical illusions which distort our perception of the surrounding environment.



Dream Stone, 2010
Sui Jianguo
Dream Stone, 2010
Stainless sandy steel
H 91 x 146 x 107 inches
Edition of 3 ex


Artwork presented in
2015-2018

Dream Stone was born out of a pebble found on the 2010 Shanghai World Expo construction site. The modest stone was digitally scanned, modelled, and enlarged thousands of times, and a set of steel plaques was then manufactured, laser cut and assembled, with its overlapping layers forming a honeycomb structure. The finished product is a monumental sculpture that evokes the harmony between nature and the contemporary world, and the metamorphoses enabled by new technology.



Cloud Cities / Air-Port-City 4 Modules Metal, 2010-2011
Tomás Saraceno
Cloud Cities / Air-Port-City 4 Modules Metal, 2010-2011
Aluminum, mirror glass, steel, dibond, iron, steel rope
H 139 x 268 x 155 inches
Unique artwork


Artwork presented in
2015-2018

Cloud Cities is an architectural utopia created by Tomás Saraceno to find a solution for  over-population and environmental destruction. Inspired by Frankfurt’s eponymous Airport City, this work is a constellation of imposing, interconnected modules. It invites the viewer to enter and move around in this geometrically complex space – a union of architecture, art, and science. This prototype of a floating city imagined as a cluster of cells alludes to Buckminster Fuller’s utopist architecture, and in particular to his levitating sphere project, Cloud Nine.



A Giant Leap of Faith, 2006
Subodh Gupta
A Giant Leap of Faith, 2006
Stainless steel
H 275.6 x 70.9 x 70.9 inches
Edition of 3 ex


Artwork presented in
2015-2018

A worthy heir to the Duchampian legacy, Subodh Gupta collects everyday objects to make monumental installations and sculptures. These objects, most often stainless steel kitchen utensils, allude to Indian culture and the social and political realities of the country. In his piece A Giant Leap of Faith, Gupta piled up 13 buckets to form a monumental column. The bucket, a symbol of the daily labour of millions of people, here takes on a spiritual dimension, much like the strange concrete monuments scattered through the Indian countryside.



128 squares and their demonstration, 2015
Claudia Comte
128 squares and their demonstration, 2015
Cinder blocks wall, paint
H 118.1 x 236.2 inches
Unique artwork


Artwork presented in
2015-2018

Claudia Comte is a multidisciplinary artist whose work spans the media of installation, sculpture, painting, drawing, pyrography, photography. This mural consists of a green and black geometric grid on a wall measuring 3 x 6 meters (118x236 inches). Claudia Comte frequently creates monumental paintings that literally submerge the viewer andthe works that surround them in hypnotic patterns. The repetitive rhythms and vibrant colours of these paintings distort with playful frivolity the canon of Visual Art and Minimalist painting. This sculpture was realized specifically for the Domaine du Muy.



Artwork created in situ
4 centres délimitant un carré, 2008
David Saltiel
4 centres délimitant un carré, 2008
Mirror polished stainless steel
H 72 x 64.2 x 64.2 inches
Edition of 11 ex


Artwork presented in
2015-2018

This artwork is composed of four elements which demarcate and frame a cubic space; each is formed of two plates of polished, reflective steel which intersect at a 90° angle. They are 72 inches high, a measurement taken from Le Corbusier’s Modulor. The visitor may enter into the cubic space, a mise en abyme created by the gleaming surfaces of the piece. As an open air installation, the work also reflects its surroundings, to the extent that it seems to disappear completely into them.



Narcissus Garden, 1966-2011
Yayoi Kusama
Narcissus Garden, 1966-2011
1 600 stainless steel spheres
Variable dimensions, each sphere diam. 11 inches
Unique artwork


Artwork presented in
2015-2017

Yayoi Kusama bases her work around recurring themes such as the infinite, or the self-portrait. She creates her work through the obsessive repetition of a single motif, generally polka dots. Her Narcissus Garden installation is made up of 1600 stainless steel mirrored spheres designed to float in a pool or pond. The work was presented for the first time in 1966 at the 33rd Venice Biennale, when Yayoi Kusama, who had not been invited to the event, poured the reflective spheres into the canals outside the Italian pavilion.



La Petite Maison, 2015
Roman Signer
La Petite Maison, 2015
Little wooden house
H 59 x 59 x 59 inches
Unique artwork


Artwork presented in
2015-2016

La Petite Maison [The Little House] is a performance created especially for the inauguration of the Domaine du Muy. A wooden cottage is suspended from a helicopter, then released in mid-air to crash down in the midst of nature. This act is characteristic of the spectacular violence at work in Roman Signer’s performances. As he says himself, ‘for me, an explosion is not a destruction but a transformation’.



Artwork created in situ
Knot II, 2010
Antony Gormley
Knot II, 2010
Grey iron
H 51 x 77.6 x 49.6 inches
Unique artwork


Artwork presented in
2015

In Knot II, part of the EXTENDED BLOCKWORKS series (2010-2012), the artist assembles a shape composed of multiple blocks, extending out on three distinct axes. Gormley turns to an architectural framework, as the different elements of the piece are stacked, held up and supported in an unstable position, evoking the tensions inherent to urban settings.



Vélo Girouette, 2015
Roman Signer
Vélo Girouette, 2015
Bike, metal plinth
H 156 inches approx.
Unique artwork


Artwork presented in
2015-2016

Made from a bicycle attached to the top of a metal mast, this weather vane perpetually turns at the behest of the wind. This particular phenomenon of constant movement around a fixed point represents both the humour and the absurdity typical of Roman Signer’s work. The artist, who is fascinated by bicycles, has created several performance pieces since 1982, notably at the 48th Venice Biennale, where he rode a bike in circles around a pillar. Their significance lies precisely in the insurmountable contradiction between the dynamic and the static, and this creates an impression of obstinate absurdity.



Mesopotamia, 2012-2015
Anne et Patrick Poirier
Mesopotamia, 2012-2015
Black granite engraved with gold leaf
H 50.4 x 23 x 23 inches
Unique artwork


Artwork presented in
2016

For over 40 years, Anne and Patrick Poirier have visited, carried out excavations, collected and inventoried sites and relics from ancient civilizations. A tribute to the memory of the ancient Mesopotamian civilization, this black granite chair is the result of the fastidious research carried out by this duo of artists, focusing on the Mediterranean Basin, and more specifically the region that was once known as Mesopotamia—current-day Iraq and Syria. Anne and Patrick Poirier position themselves as observers of the region’s history, through the creation of works that stem as much from the perspective of an enlightened tourist, as they do from a kind of poetic archaeology.



Bob, 2010
Claire Fontaine
Bob, 2010
Black marble
H 40.6 x 23.6 x 13.8 inches
Unique artwork


Artwork presented in
2015-2018

This work, which at first glance evokes a classical marble bust, actually recreates the famous “Big Bob” punching bag used in combat sports training. Claire Fontaine humorously inverts Bob’s status, and a simple punching dummy becomes a work of art which is both literally and figuratively untouchable. This ironic reversal of conventional values is typical of Claire Fontaine’s work.



Sculpture or Pavilion?, 2015
Dan Graham
Sculpture or Pavilion?, 2015
Stainless steel frame, glass
90.5 x 135 x 135 inches
Unique artwork


Artwork presented in
2016-2017

Theorist, photographer, videographer and architect, Dan Graham has been a key figure in art since the 1960s. From the late 1970s onwards, a significant part of his work has been devoted to the design of devices or elements that are at the intersection between sculpture and architecture. These Pavilions, made of metal and transparent or reflective glass, play upon the viewer’s sensory experience. The viewer becomes aware of his own status as subject when he is confronted by his own reflection, or when he encounters others within the same space.



Untitled (grey), 2011
Peter Kogler
Untitled (grey), 2011
Painted aluminium
H 17.7 x 70.9 x 23.6 inches
Edition of 8 ex


Artwork presented in
2015-2016

Peter Kogler has developed a set of recurring motifs – ants, brains, globes, light bulbs, interlocking lines – which he has been using in a wide range of two-and three-dimensional media for the past 20 years. This deliberately limited iconography is constantly evolving, keeping pace with technological advances. The red and grey benches were laser cut in steel, following a digital template modelled on an ant. These new techniques are as common in industry as they are in art, and so Peter Kogler simultaneously creates a bench and a sculpture, thus rejecting the traditional divide between genres.



Untitled (red), 2012
Peter Kogler
Untitled (red), 2012
Painted aluminium
H 17.7 x 70.9 x 23.6 inches
Edition of 8 ex


Artwork presented in
2015-2016

Peter Kogler has developed a set of recurring motifs – ants, brains, globes, light bulbs, interlocking lines – which he has been using in a wide range of two-and three-dimensional media for the past 20 years. This deliberately limited iconography is constantly evolving, keeping pace with technological advances. The red and grey benches were laser cut in steel, following a digital template modelled on an ant. These new techniques are as common in industry as they are in art, and so Peter Kogler simultaneously creates a bench and a sculpture, thus rejecting the traditional divide between genres.



Danuza Leão [Rio], 2013
Sarah Morris
Danuza Leão [Rio], 2013
2 mirrored Duratrans on double sided LED lightbox
H 45 x 39 x 7 inches
Unique artwork


Artwork presented in
2015

In 2012, Sarah Morris produced a film and a set of paintings on the modernisation of contemporary Brazil, focusing particularly on the city of Rio de Janeiro. Danuza Leão was developed from one of these paintings. The abstract geometric composition of the work refers back to a diverse range of sources, from the architecture of Niemeyer and Lina Bo Bardi to the covers of bossa nova albums, and the heterogeneous urban environment of Rio. The use of the kind of light box typically found in signs serves to contextualise Sarah Morris’s painting within a public setting.



Mushroom UG CM 308 F4 Hok Spanish Gold Tropi Cali, 2008
Sylvie Fleury
Mushroom UG CM 308 F4 Hok Spanish Gold Tropi Cali, 2008
Fiberglass, metallic car paint
H 47.2 x 43.3 inches
Unique artwork
2015

Sylvie Fleury frequently brings together icons of Pop Art and a Minimalist aesthetic. The mushroom evokes psychotropic drugs as well as the fairy-tale atmosphere found in Alice in Wonderland’s giant fungi. This fibreglass sculpture, varnished with multiple layers of automotive paint, recalls in turn the processes of contemporary industry. Sylvie Fleury creates a hybrid work, formed by a subtle blending of feminine and masculine codes.



Teardrops, 2015
Rob Wynne
Teardrops, 2015
Bronze
H 38.2 inches / 24 inches / 16.1 inches
Unique artwork


Artwork presented in
2015

Rob Wynne’s Teardrops are bronze sculptures which literally represent tears, a motif that he has been using in his work, particularly his installations, for several years. Their colour and materiality contrast surprisingly with the form they represent. When placed in an architectural or natural setting, these pieces lend an anthropomorphic air to their immediate context. The effect of associating them with the trees in the park is both surrealist and poetic.



Mini Brothers (Oak), 2015
Vidya Gastaldon
Mini Brothers (Oak), 2015
Pairs of unique eyes made of oak, acrylic varnish
Diam. 5 inches
Unique artwork


Artwork presented in
2015-2016

Influenced by the New Age movement and psychedelic aesthetics, Vidya Gastaldon’s emotive, sensitive work liberates itself from concrete appearances and rational knowledge. Mini Brothers (Oak) brings an oak tree to life through the addition of a pair of cartoonish eyes that seem to watch as we pass by. Gastaldon thus transforms an unremarkable tree into an extraordinary character, straight out of a comic book.



J'aime l'Amérique - Hommage à Jacques Derrida, 2007
Mounir Fatmi
J'aime l'Amérique - Hommage à Jacques Derrida, 2007
Painted jumping poles, metal ladders
Variable dimensions, approx. 101.2 x 196.9 x 393.7 inches
Edition of 5 ex


Artwork presented in
2015

This work invites the viewer to circumvent notions of flag, territory and identity, perceived as obstacles to individual liberty. The piece is also an homage to the  philosopher Jacques Derrida and his principle of deconstruction. Finally, I Like America refers to Joseph Beuys’ famous 1974 performance I Like America and America Likes Me.



HEAD (Li Gao), 2013
Not Vital
HEAD (Li Gao), 2013
Stainless Steel with PVD coating
H 69 x 57 x 55 inches
Edition of 3 ex


Artwork presented in
2015

This stripped-back sculpture, which represents the abstract contours of a head, creates a hybrid physical presence in the natural setting of the park. Not Vital’s work often contrasts organic forms and industrial materials. The polished mirror surfaces of his sculptures reflect the viewer and their surroundings. This symbiosis between the form and material, the work and its setting, invites us to partake in contemplation and meditation.



Les Ilots, 2010
Claude Parent
Les Ilots, 2010
Steel and aluminium
59 x 71 x 90.5 inches, 51 x 51 x 104 inches and 83 x 59 x 118 inches
Unique artwork


Artwork presented in
2016

Architect and theorist, Claude Parent, passed away in 2016. He was one of France’s most renowned architects on the international scene. A fierce opponent of the work of both Haussmann and Le Corbusier, he received the Prix National d’Architecture in 1979. He is the father of the ‘Function of the Oblique’, which established a new relationship to the ground, based on instability and disequilibrium. His sloping lines, and irregular and discontinuous forms are remarkably combined in Les Îlots, a work composed of two elements in steel and aluminium, which are at once objects of furniture design and sculpture.



Clarice Again, 1966-1967
Niki de Saint Phalle
Clarice Again, 1966-1967
Painted polyester
H 74.8 x 55 x 49 inches
Unique artwork


Artwork presented in
2015

This piece forms part of the earliest period of the Nanas [chicks], the sexy, curvaceous, feminine sculptures that would become emblematic of the artist’s oeuvre. In 1965, inspired by the rounded body of her then pregnant friend, Clarice Rivers, Niki de Saint Phalle started creating sculptures of women with voluptuous figures, adorned with brightly-coloured decorative patterns. These bold images of triumphant femininity and motherhood reflect a new perspective on womankind that emerged in the 1960s.



Fontaine aux Nanas
Niki de Saint Phalle
Fontaine aux Nanas
Painted polyester, electric system
H 21.7 x 88.6 x 88.6 inches
Edition of 3 ex


Artwork presented in
2015-2017

This fountain/sculpture, painted in lustrous colours, depicts the Nanas [chicks], the emblematic female figures of the artist’s oeuvre, joyfully reunited in a bath. The women’s rounded mouths and breasts spout jets of water. The playfulness shown in this work is an homage to uninhibited femininity and sexuality. A copy of the fountain can be found in the artist’s Tarot Garden, a masterwork created by Niki de Saint Phalle between 1979 and 1993.



Le Gisant, Youri Gagarine, 2009
Xavier Veilhan
Le Gisant, Youri Gagarine, 2009
Aluminium casting, resin, polyurethane painting
H 30 x 177 x 73 inches
Unique artwork


Artwork presented in
2015

This sculpture pays homage to the Russian cosmonaut Yuri Gagarin, who in 1961 became the first man to travel in space. Veilhan depicts Gagarin as a recumbent figure – a man lying flat on his back – a posture taken from medieval funerary sculptures. Paradoxically, the piece was made using the most innovative of modern materials and production techniques. This fusion of classical style and contemporary production methods is characteristic of Xavier Veilhan’s work.



L'Arbre à Pluie, 1995
Michel François
L'Arbre à Pluie, 1995
Piping system and sprayers in the branches of a tree
Variable dimensions
Unique artwork


Artwork presented in
2015-2016

The world of Michel François appears incredibly vibrant, thanks to his use of dynamic, constantly changing materials. In L’Arbre à pluie [The Rain Tree], a vaporisation system produces a mist of fine rain that envelops a tree entirely. Beyond the spectacular, supernatural aspect of this work, the subtle movements of the drizzle deform the contours of the tree and create infinite variations of light, challenging our perceptions.